Learn to Sight Sing in Minutes a Day.

A Three Step, Rhythm First Method.

Become a better sight singer.

Each exercise only takes a few minutes.

Rehearsal time is precious, but you want your kids prepared for not just for auditions, but for life as a musician.

If you’re a choir director, set aside 5 minutes right after warmups and just work through one exercise with the choir.  Double your efforts by letting them work on their own.

Lean on solfege when you need it.

Every melodic exercise can be viewed with solfege syllables or without.  Help is there when you need it while you build your confidence.

Rhythmic exercises can be viewed with the counts written underneath to help you build that critical foundation.

Practice with built in audio support.

You could open a sight singing book, pick an exercise and give it a shot, but how will you know how you did?  It’s a lot like practicing basketball without a hoop. Basketball provides a hoop so you have a visual target to shoot for.

Answer Tracks give you a frame of reference so you know how the exercise was supposed to sound.

If you’re brand new to this, you may start by singing along with the answer track. Don’t sweat it—you’re not cheating—you’re just training your ear.  As you get better and more confident, try the exercises without the audio track first, then listen to compare how you did.

Learn before you practice.

Exercises alone aren’t enough because they don’t offer instruction.

The Practice Room provides dozens of courses that include short video lessons.

The lessons break down the concepts into bite sized chunks. In the video lessons, there’s an exercise or two with singers.  You can hear how the exercise sounds with someone actually singing it, instead of just a piano sound.  Leaning on the singer can give you a deeper understanding of rhythmic counting and solfege before you venture into exercises with piano audio tracks.

Build on your skills with a proven curriculum.

As you work on your skills, you want to make sure you’re working on the right things in the right order. Start at the beginning with note names and music basics, as new levels as you gain confidence.

The curriculum at The Practice Room has been tested in hundreds of choral settings with thousands of singers.  

For teachers, there are free PDF workbooks if you want to print them for rehearsals.

Manage students of different levels with ease.

In any choir program there’s a mix of new singers who haven’t learned to read or sight sing, and old veterans who are great at this.  They’re often right next to each in rehearsal. Figuring out the best way to address those individual needs is a challenge.

Let the students work on what they need to learn. Organize your kids into Groups.

Start your first year kids at the beginning, let your veteran singers work at higher levels.  In rehearsal pick a middle ground so the kids learn to work through exercises together.

Let your singers work independently.

To make working at their own pace easier, every singer has their own account and their progress is tracked. They can choose from any course on the site.

The site will take them right back where they left off the next time they’re practicing.

With online access, you can practice anywhere you have an internet connection.

Track student progress.

For teachers, it’s easy to track student progress.  Log into your dashboard and choose from multiple report types.

Check students quiz scores in the Gradebook and their course progress.

If you have multiple classes or choirs, you can sort them into groups for easy management.